Does Cadillac support Voting Rights?

http://cadillac.com

Cadillac is owned by General Motors

General Motors has one of the worst track records across any major corporation in America when it comes to their position on voting rights. After January 6, General Motors said that it had "paused new political contributions" and future contributions would be guided by "character and public integrity criteria." Exactly three months later, GM CEO Mary Barra renewed the same commitment on Linkedin, writing that the "right to vote in a fair, free, and equitable manner is the most precious element of #democracy." Despite these public statements and promises, GM has made donations for over $100,000 to 21 Republican objectors, as well as the National Republican Senatorial Committee, breaking their own pledge in record time.

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Latest news

Black voters coalition calls out GM, Blue Cross Blue Shield for supporting ‘voter suppression’

About three dozen activists from the Defend Black Voters Coalition rallied on Detroit’s riverfront on Monday to criticize what they described as voter suppression efforts backed by corporate entities, while General Motors’ Board of Directors met in the nearby Renaissance Center.

by Michigan Advance

Activists call on Michigan corporations to stop funding anti-democracy politicians with guerrilla banner campaign

Some Michigan-based companies continue to fund campaigns of politicians pushing voter restriction bills

by Detroit Metro Times

Big companies renege on their promises to fight assaults on abortion, voting rights and democracy

Many companies that once expressed a commitment to end or at least review their contributions to the 147 Republicans who voted against certifying the election have gone ahead and contributed to those lawmakers in subsequent months.

by Los Angeles Times

The corporations behind Trump's coup are back at it

After the Capitol riot, Big Business promised to stop donating to the "Sedition Caucus." That vow didn't last long

by Salon

Corporations, trade groups gave over $8 million to GOP election objectors following Jan. 6 riot, new study shows

Since the deadly Jan. 6 riot on Capitol Hill, Republican lawmakers who objected to the results of the 2020 presidential election received over $8 million in campaign donations from corporations and trade groups, according to a new study first shared with CNBC.

by CNBC

Activists target corporate campaign cash in battle against voting restrictions

by Iowa Capital Dispatch

Activists target corporate campaign cash in battle against voting restrictions

Members of the Defend Black Voters Coalition chose Detroit’s Huntington Center as their backdrop earlier this month when they issued a warning about the dangers of “voter suppression legislation” backed by Michigan Republican state lawmakers.

by Ohio Capital Journal

Big corporations that claim to support voting rights are still funding right-wing state AGs

Coke, GM, AT&T pay "lip service" to voting rights while funding GOP vote-suppression forces, says watchdog group

by Salon

The January 6 corporate accountability index

After a violent mob stormed the Capitol building in January, hundreds of corporations pledged to make changes to their political giving. Some corporations pledged to withhold PAC funding to the 147 Republicans who voted to overturn the election, setting the stage for the riot. Other corporations said they were suspending all PAC activity and others promised to reevaluate their giving criteria in light of the violence.

by Popular Information

GM under fire for campaign contributions to GOP objectors

After January 6, General Motors said that it had "paused new political contributions" and future contributions would be guided by "character and public integrity criteria." Since then, General Motors has donated $77,500 to 14 members of the House and Senate who voted to overturn the election. That total includes $10,000 to House Speaker Kevin McCarthy (R-CA). General Motors also donated $15,000 to the National Republican Senatorial Committee, which is chaired by Senator Rick Scott (R-FL), who also voted to overturn the election.

by Popular Information

GM said it was a champion for voting rights, sent 125K to GOP group pushing voter suppression

On April 6, General Motors CEO Mary Barra wrote on LinkedIn that the "right to vote in a fair, free, and equitable manner is the most precious element of #democracy." Barra then expounded at length on GM's "support of voter rights."

by Popular Information

More Corporate PACs Resume Political Donations to Republicans Who Rejected Election Results

by Wall Street Journal

These corporations broke the commitments they made after January 6

It's been nearly five months since the attack on the United States Capitol. But in many respects, nothing has changed. None of the 147 Republicans who voted to overturn the election on January 6 — fueling the lie that motivated the attack — have expressed contrition or remorse. Several have attempted to

by Popular Information

What corporate PACs are doing 6 months after the attack on the Capitol

Shortly after the January 6 attack on the Capitol, which was motivated by Trump's lies about election fraud, Comcast — the parent company of NBC Universal — released the following

by Popular Information

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